Hey Majesty

“Montreal’s Hey Majesty (aka Tom Jarvis) delivers a great little 8-song album, ‘The Peeling Factory’. There’s ’60s swirling psychedelia, ’70s krautrock/glam, some ’80s new wave (a la Devo), and then he delivers it all up with fresh contemporary embellishments such as tape delays, reverb/echo, sampling and looping. Highlights include “Kamikaze” with its great groove and “Capsized” in which Jarvis shows off his ability to play just about every instrument on the planet.”
Mark Anthony Brennan. Ride the Tempo

Celluloid (definition)

1.
a tough, highly flammable substance . . .
2.
motion-picture film.

This album is, in effect, made up of collaborations with a ghostwriter – Montreal film director Brian Barnhart – whose script, ‘Bring Me Flowers’, provided the inspiration for the music. It is more usual that a musician composes the soundtrack after seeing the movie – or at least some of it. In this instance the music has been composed before a shot of film has been made. I felt that the text could be transposed into music and would then in turn inspire those same words to come to life when creating the images. Many of these pieces are one-take improvisations. The ‘yeah!’ you hear at the end of the opening track is director Barnhart, who sat opposite me as I played banjo, directing my performance like an actor in one of his movies. I’m no Marlon Brando but I’m ok on the banjo. I have added other pieces I composed for Barnhart’s short film ‘Bad Time Montreal’ which was completed in 2013.

Hey Majesty is down in the groove of soul and high on the peyote kiss of psychedelia.

Hey Majesty is headlines, breakfast philosophy and phonetics.

Hey Majesty is on the stereo when the streets get hot and the dusk light lingers and your cheeks feel warm and red from the drink and the sunshine and your mind is spinning deliriously and your feet are dancing involuntarily and you need to keep going; eating doughnuts, riding horses with Genghis Khan, keeping the peace on the dance floor, raising your voice against those holding you back, hiding those guilty eyes from prying minds, all the time watching that Heaven don’t fall on ya.

Hey Majesty is for the feet, the mind and the heart and soul.